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L'EXERCICE DU RESSORT

Exhibition & Events
March 24 - April 6, 2017
Michel Journiac Gallery, Paris

At the core of every action lies a physical force. Nestled within the entrails of the mechanism, the spring is its driving element, the active cause. This elastic organ, invisible yet essential, exerts a fascinating flow: it stretches, producing movement, and then relaxes, returning to its original position. It also characterizes the energy that animates every production, action, or commitment.
The current political and social context widens gaps that manifest through identity retreats and societal tensions, compounded by a loss of trust in any form of authority in an era where the influence of post-truth is on the rise. From the complexity of the system in which we operate arise as many possibilities for engagement as there are for succumbing to immobilization, a consequence of bewildering confusion. It is the desire to transcend this state that initiates the exercise of the spring, the driving force of taking a stance.
However, the nature of the spring, due to its resistance, confines its movement to a defined space. This space constitutes the gap that the exhibition "The Exercise of the Spring" aims to occupy in order to rekindle our perspective on the world, suspended between action and inaction. The moment of reflection preceding action, indeed, already holds a form of commitment through its power of evocation. This time of latency and incubation encourages us to unleash our imagination and its effective power, too often underestimated. Thus assembled, the artworks create a space for questioning, both regarding their creation and presentation context.

with: Farah Atassi, Kader Attia, Christophe Cuzin, Sépànd Danesh, Emma Dusong, Jean-Baptiste Perrot, Jean-Charles de Quillacq, Anna-Katharina Scheidegger, Georges Tony Stoll, Raphaël Tiberghien + a selection of videos.

Sepand DANESH-Soulevement-2015-exercice-ressort-polynome web.jpg

Sépànd Danesh, Soulèvement, 2015 (detail)
Oil, acrylic and spray on canvas, 140 x 200 cm

Société Générale Collection

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